Advertisement

Breeds Facts Stories

LABRADOR RETRIEVER FIVE THINGS THAT YOU SHOULD KNOW.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Introduction

The Labrador Retriever, or”the Labrador and Lab as it is often referred to, is always in the top spot on league tables for being the most loved canine breed within the UK (and probably all over the world), According to Kennel Club data. It is likely because of the breed’s calm but outgoing personality. Always looking to please and exceptionally clever, Labrador Retriever is also known as one of the easiest breeds to train.

Originally bred to hunt fowl and game in the wild, it is the Labrador Retriever excels when asked to perform tasks in challenging and complex environments. They’re better adept at working near water because of their keenness and the water-resistant coat they have. They also excel in other pursuits, such as serving as Guide Dogs and Assistant Dogs and creating wonderful family pets, particularly for families with children, as they are recognized worldwide for being extremely friendly with children of all age groups.

History

It is believed that the Labrador Retriever, as the name suggests, was created for a specific use to catch the game after it had been shot and flushed by hunters in the most challenging conditions. The breed originated in the areas of the coastline of Newfoundland, where the dogs are believed to have been created through crossbreeding St John’s Water Dogs with smaller breeds of water dogs, and perhaps Mastiffs which were brought into the nation by Portuguese fishermen during the 16th and 17th century.

Labrador Retrievers were introduced to the UK in the 1800s with the help of Earl Malmsbury and Colonel Peter Hawker. Both men fascinated the breed and arranged for several breeds to be shipped to the UK. Many Chocolate Labradors are descendants of an earlier Labrador Retriever called Buccleuch Avon, which was given to Duke Buccleuch within Scotland in 1890 from the kennels of the Duke of Malmsbury. Another dog named Malmesbury Tramp, owned by Countess Howe is one of the ancestors of Labrador Retrievers today. Nowadays.

Advertisement

Advertisement